We tend to think we are protected from pollutants present in the air we breathe outside our homes. We want to shield ourselves and our families from carbon dioxide, pollen, smog and foreign particles produced by who knows what. However, the air that circulates inside our homes might not be safer for breathing either. All living things release small particles into the air like hair, dander, dead skin and carbon dioxide. Moreover, most of us have pets who multiply the quantity of hair and skin particles that float around us. Let´s add the byproducts of normal activities like cooking, smoking, washing and drying clothes, or even turning up a gas-based heater. In nature, all these particles are dispersed in the atmosphere, rending them virtually harmless and sharply diminishing their impact close to zero. But, unless you have an incredibly efficient air circulation system, all these pollutants get trapped in your home. More specifically in your air ducts, carpets, upholstery, dryer vents and furniture. This invites unwanted guests into your home. Creatures that thrive in such rich environment, like mold, mites, and many kinds of insects, and they start to produce their own debris as well. The only way to keep control of this unseen chaos is to make sure these particles find their way out of your home. An efficient and clean air duct system normally serves this function, but it must be regularly cleaned as, with time, it starts collecting buildup, caked in debris, and even rodents and birds. This all affects both your indoor air quality, and your HVAC Unit´s efficiency. Hiring Air Duct Cleaning Dallas Professionals twice a year to perform a complete check up of your filters and air ducts helps prevent polluted air to be recirculated inside your home. Keep your family safe and enjoy the benefits of having the cleanest air inside your home.
Your cleaning service should involve all aspects of your duct work to maximize energy efficiency and air quality. This includes attending to the heat exchanger, blower, drain pan, plenum and coils as well. In the process, your service provider may find that you're facing larger issues than debris and build-up. The professional may recommend having your furnace repaired if they notice, for example, damage to your heat exchanger or blower motor. Generally, a furnace repair costs between $130 and $500. They may also find that an A/C coil needs to be replaced rather than cleaned and would then recommend A/C repair.

Have you been hunting for an expert air duct cleaning service but nothing has worked out for you thus far? Maybe you have been flipping through the Yellow Pages for hours but you still have yet to find what you are looking for. Are you spending your time thinking of “where shall I find an expert service? Is it possible to find such a service near me?”
All these pro duct cleaners answer with "it's common sense, everything operates better when cleaner" etc. But your explanation is correct. Especially so with flex tube ducting where dust gets "stuck" between the lowest valleys (between wire coil supports) where air flow is drastically reduced -- which is more than 50 pct of the entire interior surface area of the flex ducting. That sounds like a bad thing but also has a good effect of trapping dust from escaping.
First of all, I think it is great that there are many companies out there who look out for the customer and protect their interest. Secondly, I think it is also important that customers consider having their HVAC systems checked thoroughly before moving into a new home. I have heard a couple of horror stories where previous owners have not had the best housekeeping skills. Even when the appearance of the home seems it has been well kept, keep in mind that surface clean only goes so far. You can never tell what lies underneath.
On the other hand, if a service provider fails to follow proper duct cleaning procedures, duct cleaning can cause indoor air problems. For example, an inadequate vacuum collection system can release more dust, dirt and other contaminants than if you had left the ducts alone. A careless or inadequately trained service provider can damage your ducts or heating and cooling system, possibly increasing your heating and air conditioning costs or forcing you to undertake difficult and costly repairs or replacements.
Most organizations concerned with duct cleaning, including EPA, NADCA, NAIMA and the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors' National Association (SMACNA) do not currently recommend the routine use of sealants to encapsulate contaminants in any type of duct. Instances when the use of sealants to encapsulate the duct surfaces may be appropriate include the repair of damaged fiber glass insulation or when combating fire damage within ducts. Sealants should never be used on wet duct liner, to cover actively growing mold, or to cover debris in the ducts, and should only be applied after cleaning according to NADCA or other appropriate guidelines or standards.
Demonstrate visible evidence of microbial growth in your duct work. Some service providers may attempt to convince you that your air ducts are contaminated by demonstrating that the microorganisms found in your home grow on a settling plate (i.e., petri dish). This is inappropriate. Some microorganisms are always present in the air, and some growth on a settling plate is normal. As noted earlier, only an expert can positively identify a substance as biological growth and lab analysis may be required for final confirmation. Other testing methods are not reliable.
#3 The ONLY time Duct cleaning is needed is when the home had a fire, Bad roof leak on to FIBERGLASS ductwork or house sat vacant for many years with out the air running. And its better to replace than to do “abrasive” duct cleaning. If the duct cleaning has a rotating brush it will remove part of the glue that is holding the Fiberglass in the ducts together, PERIOD no matter how much the say it don’t because the brush is soft.
You should also have air ducts cleaned after recent water contamination or water damage to prevent mold; after renovations or remodeling to ensure debris and dust didn’t settle in the vents and ducts; if you are having problems with allergies or asthma; or when you are moving into a newly purchased home, especially if the previous owners smoked or had pets. The National Air Duct Cleaners Association (NADCA) recommends getting your air ducts cleaned every three to five years, or every two to three years in regions where homeowners use their air conditioning and heater for many months of the year, while the EPA suggests homeowners have duct cleaning done as needed.
Professional cleaning involves getting the dust and debris outside, so they use outdoor ventilation equipment. It is so important that homeowners make sure the professional contractor is using good equipment then, as they could otherwise spread the spores into the home and further agitate sensitive family members. In the case of mold, a cleaner will only be able to tell you it is there, followed by needing an additional mold professional to come out and test or remove the mold. Air duct cleaning industries do not require state licensing, so make sure to check for a company with references.
Ok what you said is true but in most cases ducts are in a duct flex format, and knowing that the dust in people's flex duct is just surface dust, any real debris that are in the duct itself will result in very little to no air flow which will keep your unit from performing properly, but if it is true allergy reasons then replacing your duct system is better for overall better air quality, plus if you do pay attention to the warranty on flexible duct is that it only has a 10 year warranty and typically only lasts for 20 years so do your research before having a duct cleaning, and to add one more thing if your duct work is completely metal and you can't see visible insulation then your duct on the inside has insulation inside of it, if you replace that with duct work that is clean metal on the inside and wrapped with insulation on the outside then it will further reduce the air bourne fiberglass and dust.
Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems have been shown to act as a collection source for a variety of contaminants that have the potential to affect health, such as mold, fungi, bacteria, and very small particles of dust. The removal of such contaminants from the HVAC system and home should be considered as one component in an overall plan to improve indoor air quality.
Air duct cleaning is done by heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) professionals. The pros use industrial-strength, truck-mounted vacuums and powerful brushes and hoses to clean inside the metal ducts that make up your forced air heating and cooling system. The Environmental Protection Agency recommends duct cleaning if there is “substantial visible mold growth inside hard surface ducts, ducts that are infested with vermin such as rodents or insects, or ducts that are clogged with excessive amounts of dust and debris and/or particles are actually released into the home from your supply registers.”
We tend to think we are protected from pollutants present in the air we breathe outside our homes. We want to shield ourselves and our families from carbon dioxide, pollen, smog and foreign particles produced by who knows what. However, the air that circulates inside our homes might not be safer for breathing either. All living things release small particles into the air like hair, dander, dead skin and carbon dioxide. Moreover, most of us have pets who multiply the quantity of hair and skin particles that float around us. Let´s add the byproducts of normal activities like cooking, smoking, washing and drying clothes, or even turning up a gas-based heater. In nature, all these particles are dispersed in the atmosphere, rending them virtually harmless and sharply diminishing their impact close to zero. But, unless you have an incredibly efficient air circulation system, all these pollutants get trapped in your home. More specifically in your air ducts, carpets, upholstery, dryer vents and furniture. This invites unwanted guests into your home. Creatures that thrive in such rich environment, like mold, mites, and many kinds of insects, and they start to produce their own debris as well. The only way to keep control of this unseen chaos is to make sure these particles find their way out of your home. An efficient and clean air duct system normally serves this function, but it must be regularly cleaned as, with time, it starts collecting buildup, caked in debris, and even rodents and birds. This all affects both your indoor air quality, and your HVAC Unit´s efficiency. Hiring Air Duct Cleaning Dallas Professionals twice a year to perform a complete check up of your filters and air ducts helps prevent polluted air to be recirculated inside your home. Keep your family safe and enjoy the benefits of having the cleanest air inside your home.
You may be familiar with air ducts that are constructed of sheet metal. However, many modern residential air duct systems are constructed of fiber glass duct board or sheet metal ducts that are lined on the inside with fiber glass duct liner. Since the early 1970's, a significant increase in the use of flexible duct, which generally is internally lined with plastic or some other type of material, has occurred.
In addition, the service provider may propose applying chemical biocides, designed to kill microbiological contaminants, to the inside of the duct work and to other system components. Some service providers may also suggest applying chemical treatments (sealants or other encapsulants) to encapsulate or cover the inside surfaces of the air ducts and equipment housings because they believe it will control mold growth or prevent the release of dirt particles or fibers from ducts. These practices have yet to be fully researched and you should be fully informed before deciding to permit the use of biocides or chemical treatments in your air ducts. They should only be applied, if at all, after the system has been properly cleaned of all visible dust or debris.
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