Once i received a call from a Person he Named Steve and He told me that he is from some like GTA Home services and providing Air duct Cleaning in around 105$ and i booked an appointment because he convince me in very will mannered so i agree the services i placed an order and i don't think that they guyz do a great job as he describe but they do same as he told me on phone i'm just surprised that they do a great job and they provide me free inspections of furnace and A/C as well and they really do a great job and they don't waist my money and time. thanks Adam Stevenson and GTA home service Team.

Air duct cleaning implies cleaning of the conduits in the HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning) system. It includes cleaning of supply and return air ducts, registers, grilles, diffusers, heat exchangers, heating and cooling coils, condensate drain pans, fan motor, fan housing, and air handling unit housing. These ducts gather particles of dust, pollen, and other debris. They can also become a hub of microbiological growth (e.g., mold) with the presence of moisture. Spores from such growth can get released into your living space and cause respiratory irregularities, autoimmune disorders, and some environmental allergies.
I had someone out to clean my ducts last weekend. He took a blue bag up in my attic. He came back down in just a few minutes and said I had mold and he even showed me a picture of something saying it was mold but I couldn’t really tell. I refused his service to take care of the mold. He went back up in the attic for a little while and then came down. I never heard any sounds that he was actually up there doing anything. How do I know if he actually cleaned the air ducts?
The next step was cleaning the cold air returns. He found a good spot to drill an 8” hole for his vacuum hose. The procedure matched the other air ducts except that when he finished at the two cold return registers he drilled several holes in the cold ducts in the basement and blasted air into them. Because of our houses age and the upgraded return system, I noticed that the main sheet metal return duct had no top but was just butted up against the ceiling in the basement. When he blasted air in, dust and crap shot out the edges along the ceiling. Once he finished that he removed the filter and “swept” out anything at the bottom of the return with his hand into the 8” hose.

NADCA and EPA both have good points. Although, organizations are made to make money. Common sense and looking at NADCA and EPA pre-checklist. If you don't see it in the check list, you don't have to do it! But, if you do, look up Diamond certified co.s and the BBB. Beware of bait and switch scams, $60 vents and the like coupons which claim to help all for the measley sum of $79.00 bucks.
Duct cleaning is also important for energy saving. The U.S. Department of Energy specifies that almost half of the energy used for heating or cooling a home is wasted due to that contaminants pulled into it. These pollutants make your HVAC system work harder to deliver the desired output and also bring down its longevity. Therefore it is quite essential to get the ducts cleaned periodically.
NADCA and EPA both have good points. Although, organizations are made to make money. Common sense and looking at NADCA and EPA pre-checklist. If you don't see it in the check list, you don't have to do it! But, if you do, look up Diamond certified co.s and the BBB. Beware of bait and switch scams, $60 vents and the like coupons which claim to help all for the measley sum of $79.00 bucks.
While you consider having your air ducts cleaned, it is a good idea to take a look at your dryer vent. If your dryer vent is clogged, you could be losing energy efficiency. Worse yet, you could be increasing the risk of a house fire. Having your dryer vent professionally cared for costs about $130 on average, and could save you a bit of money and a lot of headaches in the future. For more information on the benefits and cost of having your dryer vent cleaned, take a look at our comprehensive cost guide.
Air duct cleaning service providers may tell you that they need to apply chemical biocide to the inside of your ducts as a means to kill bacteria (germs) and fungi (mold) and prevent future biological growth. They may also propose the application of a "sealant" to prevent dust and dirt particles from being released into the air or to seal air leaks. You should fully understand the pros and cons of permitting application of chemical biocides or sealants. While the targeted use of chemical biocides and sealants may be appropriate under specific circumstances, research has not demonstrated their effectiveness in duct cleaning or their potential adverse health effects. No chemical biocides are currently registered by EPA for use in internally-insulated air duct systems (see Should chemical biocides be applied to the inside of air ducts?).
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