Hello, I read your comment and I know it was two years ago but I hope you see my message. I am trying to figure out what to do as I was told that there is some cat odor in the finished basement. I think with the air conditioning running that it may carry odor. The litter boxes are always kept clean. I wonder if odor can be trapped in the ducts, if Air Duct Cleaning could help, but it is quite expensive plus I'm concerned that it may not help. Please elaborate as to why you think it doesn't work that well. Do you have any other advise? Did you work in the field of Air Duct Cleaning? Thanks so much!

Did not realize cost had gone up so much for this service. Two years ago I had furnace and ducts cleaned at my old house and it was under $400. Now the cost is $700 for this house. I will keep looking for someone to offer a lower price, check them out, and have it done. Or will find the paperwork to see who did it before. I liked this article and did learn some things. Thanks.


As a person with severe mold allergies, I live in a the South where the climate naturally breeds molds.We noticed a difference when we had our ducts cleaned.The company used a vacumn type system and covered all of our vents with plastic that was held up by the suction. We had no damage, no leaking dust/dirt back into the house and it took several hours. I think if you use a reputable company it makes the world of difference. Now we use better air filters and also have a UV light to prevent mold growth on ours system.We 'd do it again when the time comes. From your car's air filter to your dryer...anything works more efficiently when it is not filthy dirty.That's just common sense.
yes get a good company and pay the price, I found so much dust and dirt and wood and paint chips and bugs and even bottle caps in my ductwork. I hired a major plumbing company who cleaned ductwork and i will say they did an excellent job cleaning my vent. they did miss one point in my ductwork because i still started to see dust all over my furniture and i realized that my retunduct work that was connected with a piece of sheet metal beam which was 16" across , the contractor that built my condo used a 16" wide sheet of sheet metal to connect the vent system to my return for the air to return back into my condo. The contractor should have built a 8" x16" square duct by 6 feet long to connect my intake to my return instead of using a sheet of sheet metal 16" wide by using two 3' sections by 16 inches wide. That was a shor cut which caused a major problem fir me.
If you’re concerned about dust, allergens or mold, it may be time to have your air ducts cleaned. The national average cost for air duct cleaning ranges from $190 to $250. Air duct cleaning costs will vary based on a number of factors such as your location in the country, the age and condition of your air ducts, the number of linear feet to be cleaned, and any repairs your ducts may need. HVAC cleaning companies should clearly outline what is included in their services and at what rate, so always make sure you understand and have a written agreement before work begins. Here are some examples of average air duct cleaning costs:
2. If air quality is so important and duct cleaniliness is so uncertain, why not adopt doubling filtering; that is, in addition to the existing main furnace filter, add a filter at each air outlet. I understand replacing so many filters would be a burden, but air outlets can be designed for easy filter replacement. The builders and home design engineers should bear responsibility to provide good and low maintenance homes, rather than prioritizing on fancy or costly featuers for homes.
Some of the research I have done suggests to have your ducts cleaned when you first purchase a new home to remove drywall dust. Maintain your system well and you shouldn't have to do it again until you want to sell. Those are the two times cleaning was suggested. So for peace of mind maybe it is a good idea to do it even if you buy a used home and then maybe every 5-10 years.
If you don't agree with duct cleaning, fine. If there are some things that HVAC people can do to make the system need cleaning less often fine, but to suggest that I need to GO TO JAIL????? If you need to knock others to make yourself look better....... If duct cleaning is such a scam, why are their governing bodies like NADCA (which I do NOT belong to),several manufacturers of equipment, and national restoration franchises (I'm not a franchise either) who provide this service? I guess the whole world is stupid and only HVAC people are smart. I suppose I am scamming them when I clean puff backs, water damage, fire damage, and clean their carpets too? Or did I wake up one morning and say "ya know, it is great to be a hard working, honest owner operator, but I would love to provide a service that unlike everything else I do is a con and rips off the 90% referral business I busted my butt to earn"
Interesting. Giuliano Cuete and Carlo Olcese have the exact same post about pretenders and being NADCA certified, word for word. So how do you become NADCA certified? And does that mean you are not a scam artist or a "blow and do" ripoff? hmmm, interesting. The EPA says that under normal conditions, a properly maintained system should NEVER need it's ducts cleaned.

When water damage strikes, you need to act quickly. Time is of the essence. We're available 24/7 to dispatch trained, certified crews, equipment and inspection tools specializing in water damage. With our national footprint and large coverage areas throughout the country we will arrive on site and begin work quickly, minimizing the damage to your home. 
The short answer is yes, duct cleaning, done right by a reputable company will help with the smell. It is likely though the smell is coming from another source, ie the crawl space. It could also be that another rodent is dead in the duct work. A visual inspection would be in order to check for any breach in the duct system. A duct pressure test would be able to tell you how much air is leaking from the system over all. A hole large enough for an animal to enter would loses a great deal of air, over 300 CFM. It would be worth looking into having this test done and it should cost around $200. Cleaning the air handler and evaporator coil will greatly improve the performance of the air conditioner. Dirt and dust on the evaporator acts as insulation and reduces the amount of cooling done be the coil. Any quality duct cleaning should include cleaning the air handler and coil, and the tech should allow you to watch him perform the work as it is done.
If your air ducts have been damaged, you’ll need to replace them. The national average air duct replacement cost is $150-$280, which may not include materials. Factors such as duct material, labor, location of ducts and linear feet of ductwork will all affect your final costs. Labor costs will vary based on how accessible the ducts are and what material your ducts are made of. The least expensive duct material is a flexible, non-metallic ducting that costs approximately $1-$2 per linear foot. Flexible aluminum is generally more expensive and stronger than non-metallic ducting. Stainless steel ducting is the strongest, the least flexible (meaning installing it typically has higher labor rates), and usually the most expensive. An average price for air duct replacement could range between $35 and $55 per linear foot, including basic materials and labor. A typical single-family home has 6-10 duct runs; replacing or installing one duct run could average $150-$250 for labor.
My overall experience was pretty positive. I obviously don’t have much to say about how the technicians worked because it’s kind of hard to describe the elaborate equipment in words. What I will say though is that the cleaning had a significant impact on the freshness of the interior air. So in my opinion they got the job done, and that’s all I can ask for.

There are a few signs to watch out for to catch them in time. For one, if your breathing starts acting up or you start coughing or sneezing, there is probably some buildup in the vents. If you suspect mold or start hearing scritches in your pipes, there's a good chance you have enough dirt for bigger problems to unfold. You should clean your ducts and vents every few months just to be safe. This is even more important and should be done more frequently if you live in a very humid or dusty climate.
I had my ducts somewhat cleaned December 22, 2014. The hose of the machine the technitian used did not fit in some of my vents, therefore, he did not clean them. But I still paid $428.00 for the service. I will be calling the company on Monday, and kindly ask them to come back and clean the ducts they did not as they did not fullfill their part of the service.
I am in need of HVAC ADVICE!! I need a new furnace badly, mine is cracked. I have bought both a 95 % AFUE furnace and a 5 Ton evap coil, I figured it should all be replaced at once for both cost and efficency. My question is with all the negaitive things I have heard about companies ripping you off, what type of price should I pay someone for putting in those two items and bringing everything in my attic up to code? I have been quoted $550 - $ 3300. Wide margin here!! Then of course comes the licencing part!! I know in my heart that I should use a licenced contractor but I have had such bad luck and prices from them that honestly one that was licened in Ga. and just not here in TN and is a tech. which charges 1100 - 2200 less sounds good as so long as I pay some type of Profenial HVAC person say $100 to inspect the work after its done and before I pay them.
You may consider having your air ducts cleaned simply because it seems logical that air ducts will get dirty over time and should be occasionally cleaned. Provided that the cleaning is done properly, no evidence suggests that such cleaning would be detrimental. EPA does not recommend that the air ducts be cleaned routinely, but only as needed. EPA does, however, recommend that if you have a fuel burning furnace, stove or fireplace, they be inspected for proper functioning and serviced before each heating season to protect against carbon monoxide poisoning.
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